TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

Course Content

At the Department of Architecture at TUT, there are two mainstream courses namely: B Tech : Architecture Professional and B Tech: Architectural Technology. For the first three academic years, the two courses follow the same academic program, where after the student will have a choice to either pursue the professional or the technology stream.

B Tech: Architecture Professional

Presentation:

This course is offered on a day-class basis. Registration will take place In January only. Duration: Four years, presented as follows:
First year: Formal academic training at the University.
Second year: The subject Architectural Technology Practice II takes place in an architectural office in two six-month modules. A student will be allocated to either the first or second six-month period. The other six prescribed subjects are then offered at the University in the alternative six months.
Third year: Formal academic training at the University. Fourth year: Formal academic training at the University.
Options: After the completion of the third year, students have the following options regarding registration for the fourth year:

i. B Tech Architecture: Professional (BTPS09)

ii. B Tech Architectural Technology: Technology (BTAQ95).

First Year
History of Architecture I
Theory of Design I
Construction Methods I
Construction Materials I
Applied Building Science I
Contract Documentation I
Computer-Aided Draughting I
Communication I
Computer Applications I
Architectural Design I
Presentation Techniques I
Second Year Prerequisite Subject
Construction Methods II Construction Methods I
Construction Materials II Construction Materials I
Architectural Design II Architectural Design I
Theory of Design II Theory of Design I
Contract Documentation II Contract Documentation I
Computer-Aided Design II Computer-Aided Draughting I, Computer Applications I
Architectural Technology Practice II Architectural Design I, Theory of Design I, Construction Methods I, Construction Materials I, Contract Documentation I, Computer-Aided Draughting I
 Third Year Prerequisite Subject
Architectural Design III Architectural Design II
Theory of Design III Theory of Design II
Construction Methods III Construction Methods II
Construction Materials III Construction Materials II
Landscape Design III Architectural Design II
Surveying for Architecture III  
Building Services III  
Computer-Aided Draughting III Computer-Aided Draughting II
Office Practice III Architectural Technology Practice III
Contract Documentation III Contract Documentation II
Specification and Quantities III Computer-Aided Design II
 Fourth Year Prerequisite Subject
Principles of Urban Design IV Architectural Design III (minimum mark 70%) and Theory of Design III
Theory of Design IV Theory of Design III
Construction Methods IV Construction Methods III
Construction Materials IV   Construction Materials III
Advanced Computer Applications IV Computer-Aided Draughting III
Architectural Design IV (Mod1) Architectural Design III (minimum mark 70%) and Theory of Design III
Architectural Design IV (Mod2) Architectural Design III (minimum mark 70%) and Theory of Design III
Project Management IV Office Practice III
Law and Contract Management IV Office Practice III
Structures IV Applied Building Science I and Building Services III

 

B-Tech ArchitecturAL Technology

Presentation:
This course is offered on a day-class basis only

Registration:
In January only

Duration:
Four years, presented as follows: 

First year: Formal academic training at Tshwane University of Technology

Second year: The subject Architectural Technology Practice II takes place in an architectural office in two six-month modules. A student will be allocated to either the first or second six-month period. The other six prescribed subjects are then offered at Tshwane University of Technology in the alternative six months.

Third year: Formal academic training at Tshwane University of Technology

Fourth year: Formal academic training at Tshwane University of Technology

Subjects

First Year
History of Architecture I
Theory of Design I
Construction Methods I
Construction Materials I
Applied Building Science I
Contract Documentation I
Computer-Aided Draughting I
Communication I
Computer Applications I
Architectural Design I
Presentation Techniques I
 
Second Year Prerequisite Subject

 

Construction Methods II Construction Methods I
Construction Materials II Construction Materials I
Architectural Design II Architectural Design I
Theory of Design II Theory of Design I
Contract Documentation II Contract Documentation I
Computer-Aided Design II Computer-Aided Draughting I, Computer Applications I
Architectural Technology Practice II Architectural Design I, Theory of Design I, Construction Methods I, Construction Materials I, Contract Documentation I, Computer-Aided Draughting I
 
Third Year   Prerequisite Subject  
Architectural Design III  Architectural Design II
Theory of Design III  Theory of Design II
Construction Methods III  Construction Methods II
Construction Materials III  Construction Materials II
Landscape Design III  Architectural Design II
Surveying for Architecture III   
Building Services III   
Computer-Aided Draughting III    Computer-Aided Draughting II
Office Practice III  Architectural Technology Practice III
Contract Documentation III  Contract Documentation II
Specification and Quantities III  Computer-Aided Design II
 
Fourth Year Prerequisite Subject  
Architectural Practice IV  Office Practice III
Business Management IV  Office Practice III
Contract Documentation IV  Contract Documentation III
Specification IV  Specification and Quantities III
Construction Methods IV    Construction Methods III
Construction Materials IV  Construction Materials III
Computer Hardware IV  Computer-Aided Draughting III
Network Systems IV  Computer-Aided Draughting III
Project Management IV  Office Practice III
Law and Contract Management IV  Office Practice III
   
 

 

Post Graduate Studies and Short Courses

POST GRADUATE STUDIES

Introduction

The Part 2 Accreditation for our design-orientated master's degree (M Tech: Architecture; Professional, course code MTP SS0 allows these graduates to practice professionally in South Africa and in Commonwealth countries, after passing the relevant admission examinations.
For 2001 we restructured this course extensively to ensure that it meets or exceeds the conditions for accreditation.
Our department also offers a master's degree in architectural management for candidates more interested in that direction (M Tech: ArchitecturalTechnology: Technology). This qualification is not yet accredited, although we may apply for accreditation at a future date. Finally, we also accommodate doctoral candidates. In line with the requirements for admission to doctoral programs in the sciences, we require matric plus five years of graduate study. This means that B Arch graduates can apply.


Structure of the program

The requirements of professional practice are so demanding that the accredited master's program is now gradually being transformed into a full-time course, with part-time attendance to be phased out by 2003. The M Tech: Management course currently consists of a research dissertation only, and can conceivably still be done part-time. But if course work must be added for possible accreditation, this will certainly also become a full-time course.
Applicants with the degree B Tech: Architectural Technology: Applied Design (70% minimum in Applied Design IV) are admitted to this programe. We also welcome suitably qualified candidates from other institutions. The minimum time for completion is two years and the maximum five years.


Introduction to the Building Design Dissertation

While TUT policy is that a candidate for a master's degree must prove his or her ability to do scientific research, our accreditation body insisted on a successful building design as a condition. These requirements are complementary rather than contradictory.
The fundamental principle is that a candidate should be evaluated for proficiency to do an architect's primary job, which is to design buildings, by:

  • appraising and defining a complex architectural problem,
  • preparing an appropriate design concept and
  • developing the design.

The general conditions for a dissertation topic are that there should be a need for the project, the site, context and constraints should be real, and the architectural problem should be sufficiently complex.
Although architecture is usually classified as an "art", design begins with an analysis of a problem, and the relevant parameters and constraints to identify areas of concern and formulate broad design principles to guide decision-making. This phase relies on scientific research.
An inherent problem in evaluating the subsequent design phase is that of substantiation - judgment on the quality of design is commonly based on a consensus view of what is an appropriate solution. The ability to justify design decisions becomes, therefore, a candidate's biggest challenge!
We are relying heavily on group practice in postgraduate work. Our monthly dissertation workshops serve primarily as "support groups" at which candidates share their particular problems with peers and more advanced students for advice, but also for criticism. A lecturer serves as facilitator and advisor. This is proving a particularly effective way not only to solve problems, but also to prepare students for examination - our panels consist of ten or more people from the profession, universities and other technikons. The workshops offer students the opportunity to defend arguments and decisions in front of a large and an extremely critical audience! These workshops obviously do not replace regular one-on-one consultations with study leaders.
A candidate can choose either to design a one-off or a prototypical building, or develop design principles and norms and "test" them with a building design. The same structure is used. This is set out in more detail in the Study Guide for Postgraduate Research.


Conclusion

The postgraduate course is structured to produce architects. A dissertation and its presentation are intended to demonstrate a candidate's abilities to analyze a complex problem and design a building. The research portion should also constitute training for convincing and authoritative pre-design investigations. A large and representative panel evaluates design competency, and candidates who manage to survive that scrutiny will arguably be able to survive the robust professional world!

SHORT COURSES

CAD Courses:

Private students please note the following:

Private candidates must note that they will utilize the same presenter, facilities, study material and other requirements than the registered students for that particular course

It must be also be noted that only a Letter of Attendance will be issued by the Department of Architecture after the candidate has attended the course and passed the evaluation.

If these candidates wish to apply for credits for a specific course they must still go through a formal process of Recognition of Prior Learning according to TUT Policy documents.

 

Private students please note the following:

Private candidates must note that they will utilize the same presenter, facilities, study material and other requirements than the registered students for that particular course

It must be also be noted that only a Letter of Attendance will be issued by the Department of Architecture after the candidate has attended the course and passed the evaluation.

If these candidates wish to apply for credits for a specific course they must still go through a formal process of Recognition of Prior Learning according to TUT Policy documents.